Category: Streets

Streets of Camden, NJ. Streets are representative of the “common name” meaning the names of streets that most people are familiar with. Where possible, we try to keep up with changes based on City Council decisions.

Alley Street Stock Photo
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Mickle Street

MICKLE STREET was named after John W. Mickle, a prominent figure in both local and State affairs in the 1840’s and 1850’s.

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Cooper Street

COOPER STREET is one of the oldest streets in Camden, and is named after the Cooper family. William Cooper was one of the first settlers in this part of New Jersey. Camden was known as Cooper’s Ferries for many years prior to the city being incorporated in 1828.

Posted in Myrtle Avenue

3805 Myrtle Avenue

Posted in Streets

Myrtle Avenue

MYRTLE AVENUE is in East Camden and is actually a continuation of Fremont Avenue, beginning at South 38th Street and continuing east to the city limits at Crescent Boulevard, then carries on into Merchantville, where it ends on Maple Avenue, itself an extension of Camden’s Federal Street. Originally part of Stockton Township, which split into the Borough of Merchantville and the Town of Stockton, Myrtle Avenue appears in the Merchantville section of the 1883 Camden City Directory, then reappears in Camden City Directories beginning in 1896.

Posted in Streets

38th Street

THIRTY-EIGHTH STREET runs south from Jersey Avenue to Camden Avenue in East Camden, crossing Westfield Avenue and High Street., then picks up again for one block between Federal Street and Fremont Street.

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6th Street

SIXTH STREET runs with few interruptions from the Delaware River to Morgan Street, virtually the length of the city, from North Camden south almost all the way to Gloucester City.

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Admiral Wilson Boulevard

ADMIRAL WILSON BOULEVARD, on most road maps is simply referred to as US Route 30. Of course no one who has ever lived here would even think of the thoroughfare as anything but Admiral Wilson Boulevard. The stretch of highway, which runs from the foot of the Benjamin Franklin Bridge to the Airport Circle has been at different times one of the most famous and alternately the most infamous roads in South Jersey. The road is named for Admiral Henry Braid Wilson Jr., a Camden native and World War I naval hero. His father was also a noted figure in Camden, the H.B. Wilson school at 7th and Florence Street being named in his honor.

Posted in Streets

Crescent Boulevard

CRESCENT BOULEVARD is the street name assigned to US Route 130, which passes through Camden at four points, one in East Camden, one just south of the Cooper River, the third from south of the railroad tracks to a point opposite Grant Avenue in Haddon Township, and the fourth from Mount Ephraim Avenue to Newton Creek at Camden’s extreme southern end.

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Judson Place

JUDSON PLACE ran for a half of a block, north from 437 Stevens Street between West Street and South 5th Street  in South Camden. There were two homes on Judson Place, both were occupied as late as 1947 but have long since been razed.

Posted in Judson Place

441 Judson Place

Known residents and photos of 441 Judson Place, Camden, NJ

Posted in Judson Place

439 Judson Place

Known residents and photos of 439 Judson Place, Camden, NJ

Posted in Streets

Line Street

LINE STREET was named because it followed the finally settled line of division between the Cooper and Kaighn properties. It was originally laid out as a twenty foot alley, but in 1848 was made a street fifty foot wide. In 1848, when the city charter was amended by the State legislature, Line Street became the boundary between the Middle and South wards, Arch and Federal Streets serving as the boundary between the Middle and North Wards. Line Street is not to be confused with Liney Ditch, also known as Little Newton Creek and Kaighn’s Run, which served as the southern boundary of the South Ward. In time, under the encroachments of settlers and the march of industrial progress, the stream began to fill up and became merely a ditch, to which, by common consent, the name Line Ditch was given, as it also served to divide the lands of the Kaighn and Mickle families.