First Lady – ‘Just a Passenger’ As She Starts Flight to Coast

Camden Courier-Post – June 4, 1933

Steps Up to Window With Others and Gets Yard Long Ticket and Insists She Must Make Record-Breaking Trip

Washington, June 4. – “A ticket to Los Angeles, please.”

Mrs. Roosevelt took her place at the airport ticket window this morning in a line of 10 persons.

How do you wish to go?” the young man asked.

“It doesn’t very much matter, but I must be in Dallas tomorrow morning and Tucson tomorrow afternoon,” she replied. He handed her a yard-long ticket.

A large bi-motored plane was ferried up to the landing platform. Assorted passengers scrambled for choice seats. She stood outside to say good-bye to a few friends who had gathered. It was just then airport officials and attendants recognized their passenger and there was a general round of introductions.

“Can you tell us anything definite of your itinerary?” she was asked.

“Sorry, just can’t, except I am due to be in Dallas Monday morning and I will be there. I do not know when night flying will begin, but I rather think I shall enjoy it. Read and sleep and enjoy the scenery. But I must have breakfast in Dallas Monday, because I shall be very hungry by then. I will be in Tucson Monday afternoon and spend the night there with my old friend, Mrs. Greenway. From there I will go to Los Angeles to visit with my son, Elliott. I expect to be there the most of two days and leave in time to be in New York Friday. The return trip will be at top speed. I will fly day and night and make no stops except to change planes.”

Two pilots were at the controls. One of them stepped out, to speak to her and assure her the plane was in excellent condition.

“I know it is” she replied. “Where shall we go first?”

“Camden, N. J., and then you get another plane and start west.”

Mrs. Roosevelt waved goodbye. The weather was perfect for flying as the plane took off on its flight such as even the daring first lady had never before attempted.

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