3805 Myrtle Avenue

Myrtle Avenue

MYRTLE AVENUE is in East Camden and is actually a continuation of Fremont Avenue, beginning at South 38th Street and continuing east to the city limits at Crescent Boulevard, then carries on into Merchantville, where it ends on Maple Avenue, itself an extension of Camden’s Federal Street. Originally part of Stockton Township, which split into the Borough of Merchantville and the Town of Stockton, Myrtle Avenue appears in the Merchantville section of the 1883 Camden City Directory, then reappears in Camden City Directories beginning in 1896.

38th Street

THIRTY-EIGHTH STREET runs south from Jersey Avenue to Camden Avenue in East Camden, crossing Westfield Avenue and High Street., then picks up again for one block between Federal Street and Fremont Street.

Stock photo of a bar

Bert’s Cafe

From the 1950s through the early 1970s the bar at 1226 Broadway was known as Bert’s Cafe. It had formerly been known as Buradine’s, and the proprietor at that time was Michael Burgo. By 1959 the bar had changed hands, Bert Bottura being the proprietor, and, appropriately enough was called Bert’s Cafe.

The Clock above Camden's 1876 City Hall. This building was in use until the present City Hall was finished in late 1930.

The Clocks Atop City Hall

The first clock appeared above City Hall in 1876. Camden’s new City Hall opened early that year, although the clock was not yet in place. The first town clock in the tower of the City Hall was placed in position in May of 1876. It cost $3,575, and rang out the hours for the first time on May 26, 1876.

Third National Bank Envelope Return Address Imprint - 1960s

Third National Bank

One of the last banks to be organized in Camden, Third National Bank was organized in January of 1928. The new bank survived the depression, and remained in business as the Third National Bank & Trust Company until the 1970s, when it was merged into the United Jersey Bank. Unlike the other Camden banks that survived the Depression, Third National remained primarily a Camden institution.

Samuel M. Subers

SAMUEL SUBERS was appointed to the Camden Fire Department at some point not long after November 12, 1874 as a replacement for Alfred S. Ivins as an extra man with Engine Company 1. He served until April of 1876, when incoming Chief of the department Claudius Bradshaw made wholesale personnel changes within the department. He was reappointed in April 8, 1878 and served until April 5, 1882, again as an extra man with Engine Company 1.

Machine Gun Lead Protects Bank Gold

Camden Trust

The Camden Trust traces its origin back to July 1, 1873, when the The Camden Insurance, Safe Deposit & Trust Company, first opened for business, at 224 Federal Street. Over a period of seventy-five years, the bank merged with other local banks such as the Security Trust Company, Central Trust Company, East End Trust Company, and American National Bank Bank. The bank relocated, and underwent name changes prior to achieving it’s “modern” format in 1938. At that point the institution was the largest bank in South Jersey.

Krystal Lounge bas, as seen from the rear Jerry and Jackie the Dancing Barmaid on duty

Krystal Lounge

789 Chestnut Street apparently was a bar before Prohibition. In 1887 and 1888 Philip Barr is listed in the Camden City Directory as operating a saloon at this address. The 1908 directory shows a John A. Gorman, and the 1918-1919 directory reveals that Walter D. Leonard was the proprietor at that time.

Three-O-Three Bar

303 Kaighn Avenue The bar at 303 Kaighn Avenue was in operation as early as June of 1939, when Lauraine…

6th Street Lounge, 109 N. 6th Street, Camden, NJ

6th Street Lounge

Charles F. Sattler had a liquor license for 109 North 6th Street as early as 1938. Shortly after he renewed his license in June of 1939, the bar appears to have changed hands. The 1940 Camden City Directory shows the bar as being called The Tavern, and that the proprietors were Taggart and Davis.

Four Point Cafe, Inc.

The Four Point Bar first appears in Camden’s City Directories in 1947. The directory shows that Joseph P. Toner and Rosetta T. Jackson were involved in the ownership and/or management of the bar. Rosetta T. Jackson was the widow of James Jackson.