Tag: 10th Street

Edwin F. Allen

EDWIN FORREST ALLEN was appointed to the Camden Fire Department on October 9, 1872, as a replacement for David B. Sparks, who had resigned. He served as an extra man with the Hook and Ladder Company (present-day Ladder Company 1). He was resigned from his position with the Fire Department on June 30, 1873. He was replaced by John Gray. Edwin F. Allen was on occasion recorded as Edward F. Allen, however, Edwin was his given name.

Joseph Alcorn Tombstone

Joseph A. Alcorn

JOSEPH A. ALCORN was born in Camden, New Jersey in February of 1919 to Mary and William Alcorn. He was the youngest of eight children, coming after James G., William Joseph, Rose, Marie Frances, Thomas J., Genevieve, and Rita. The family came to Camden some time after 1914. By 1918 they had settled at 906 North 9th Street in North Camden, near the Highland woolen mills at North 10th and State Streets. William Alcorn was a foreman at the mill, and his two oldest sons also worked their when they became of age.

Nine Safety Aides Sworn by Aaron (2 of 2)

Nine Safety Aides Sworn by Aaron

Camden Courier-Post – August 12, 1950 Five recently-appointed policemen and four firemen were sworn in today by Public Safety Commissioner…

5 Cops 4 Firemen All War 2 Vets Named by Aaron 1 of 2

5 Cops, 4 Firemen, All War 2 Vets Named by Aaron

Director of Public Safety Aaron this afternoon announced the appointment of five new patrolmen and four new firemen.

Polish Air Hero to Visit Factories in Camden

A tour of Camden’s leading industrial plants following a reception at Central Airport has been arranged for Stanley F. Hausner, the “Flying Pole” of Newark, when he is the guest of this city Thursday.

Dwellings, N.W. Cor. 4th and Cedar Streets, Camden, NJ. Damaged by Wind Storm, April 2nd, 1912

Cyclone of April 2, 1912

The city of Camden was hit by tornadoes, or as they were then called, cyclones, on two occasions, August 3, 1885 and April 2, 1912. The first storm destroyed the Tabernacle Baptist Church at North 3rd and Pearl Street, and caused damage to buildings at North 3rd and Main Streets and elsewhere.

Deadly electric wires claimed a victim in Camden last evening. Harry J. Schaefer, a silk spinner, 22 years old. of 608 Vine street, in that city, was shocked to death by a live wire on Tenth street above Market about 6 o'clock. Schaefer was crossing Tenth street, laughing and talking with a friend named Long, when his foot came in contact with the wire. He fell to the ground and cried: "Won't someone hold me up?"

Death Lurked on a Camden Street

Deadly electric wires claimed a victim in Camden last evening. Harry J. Schaefer, a silk spinner, 22 years old. of 608 Vine street, in that city, was shocked to death by a live wire on Tenth street above Market about 6 o’clock. Schaefer was crossing Tenth street, laughing and talking with a friend named Long, when his foot came in contact with the wire. He fell to the ground and cried: “Won’t someone hold me up?”

A 12-year-old son of Policeman Ripley was badly bitten by dogs. On complaint of his wife that he had removed shells from their child’s grave, Samuel B. F. Alcott was held under bail yesterday by Justice Quinn. Jaines Cullen, at one time a popular comedian on the boards of Fox's Variety Theatre, Philadelphia, was before Justice Paul as a "drunk" yesterday. Hotelkeeper Charles Ricker, of Tenth and Federal streets, discovered that his bartender, who was about to sail for Australia, had "knocked down" $170 from the bar receipts. The money was recovered.

Over In Camden

A 12-year-old son of Policeman Ripley was badly bitten by dogs.

On complaint of his wife that he had removed shells from their child’s grave, Samuel B. F. Alcott was held under bail yesterday by Justice Quinn.

Jaines Cullen, at one time a popular comedian on the boards of Fox’s Variety Theatre, Philadelphia, was before Justice Paul as a “drunk” yesterday.

Hotelkeeper Charles Ricker, of Tenth and Federal streets, discovered that his bartender, who was about to sail for Australia, had “knocked down” $170 from the bar receipts. The money was recovered.

Camden builders do not seem to be deterred by the fear of financial panic or an idea that the McKinley bill presages disaster in business. New operations are in progress, and several extensive ones are contemplated early in the coming year.

New Buildings Going Up

Camden builders do not seem to be deterred by the fear of financial panic or an idea that the McKinley bill presages disaster in business. New operations are in progress, and several extensive ones are contemplated early in the coming year.

Photo taken 5-20-1871 in front of the Friendship Engine & Hose Company No.1 of Chambersburg, PA. The steam engine on the right has just arrived after being purchased from Millville, N.J. This apparatus was originally purchased by the Independence Fire Company No.3 of Camden in June 1864. It was a class two Amoskeag steamer bearing serial No. 92. Independence sold the apparatus to Millville in 1869.

Inception of the First Paid Fire Department in the US

On June 7, 1866 Camden’s City Council enacted an ordinance reorganizing the volunteer fire service to improve efficiency in operations. This ordinance provided for increased compensation to the fire companies (Weccacoe and Independence got $800 per annum to be paid quarterly, the Weccacoe and Shiffler Hose companies and the United States Fire Company received $200 annually). The volunteer fire companies were also directed to select a Chief Fire Marshal and three Assistant Marshals, one from each district. The selections were subject to approval by Council. The new department was called “The Fire Department of the City of Camden”. In protest of this ordinance the New Jersey Fire Company No.4 withdrew from the new, organized volunteer department.