Tag: 9th Street

Camden National Bank, 2003-11-22

Camden National Bank

Established in 1885, the Camden National Bank opened at 259 Kaighn Avenue on August 13, 1885. Zophar C. Howell was the first President. One of the founders, and an early vice-president was Henry B. Wilson, for whom the H.B. Wilson School at South 9th & Florence Street is named, and whose son was Admiral Henry Braid Wilson Jr., for whom the boulevard is named. Another of Wilson’s son, Philip Wilson, worked for the bank for many years. Other founders included Howard M. Cooper and Isaac C. Toone.

Eugene Alston

Eugene F. Alston

EUGENE F. ALSTON was born October  16, 1919 in Camden to Richard Alston and his wife, the former Dolly Robinson. His father had been born in 1891 in Henderson, North Carolina. Richard Alston was working as a laborer at the Victor Talking Machine Company in June of 1917, and had married. Mr. and Mrs. Alston then lived in Camden at 1017 Francis Street, a small street that ran south from Walnut to Chestnut Street, between Front and South 2nd Streets.  

Joseph Alcorn Tombstone

Joseph A. Alcorn

JOSEPH A. ALCORN was born in Camden, New Jersey in February of 1919 to Mary and William Alcorn. He was the youngest of eight children, coming after James G., William Joseph, Rose, Marie Frances, Thomas J., Genevieve, and Rita. The family came to Camden some time after 1914. By 1918 they had settled at 906 North 9th Street in North Camden, near the Highland woolen mills at North 10th and State Streets. William Alcorn was a foreman at the mill, and his two oldest sons also worked their when they became of age.

William C. Aitken

WILLIAM C. AITKEN was born around 1846. He first came to America in 1869. He moved to Camden in the early 1880s. He was active as a builder in the latter part of the 19th and early 20th centuries. He built rows of homes on Cooper Street between 9th and 11th Streets. Many of these homes were destroyed in the 1940 Hollingshead fire. He also built a row of homes on Seventh street at Woodland Avenue. At the time of the 1920 Census he made his home with wife Elizabeth at 205 Pearl Street. This home was taken in late 1923 or early 1924 to make way for the Delaware River (Ben Franklin) Bridge.

William C. Aitken later made his home at 421 Penn Street in Camden, which is now part of the Rutgers University campus. He lived very near to advertising magnate F. Wayland Ayer.

William C. Aitken died on February 14, 1933. He was survived by four sons and two daughters, nine children, and two great grandchildren. His grandson, Richard Knight Aitken, died while serving with the United States Army in Louisiana on February 17, 1943.

Wilson Adams Obituary

Age 69, of Camden. Died Friday, October 21, 2005, in Cooper Medical Center, Camden.

Born in Camden, NJ, he has been a life long area resident. He was the son of the late Everett and Emma Carter Adams. He was the husband of Elizabeth E. Brown Adams of Camden.

13 Given Oath at City Hall as New Firemen

13 Given Oath at City Hall as New Firemen

Thirteen new firemen were sworn in today by Safety Director E. George Aaron in ceremonies at City Hall.

Abandoned Kaighn School building was razed Wednesday afternoon

Police Investigate 3 Fires in 4 Hours In One Section

Police today are investigating the possibility that three fires Wednesday within a quarter-mile area inside of three hours and 46 minutes were the work of a firebug.

The funeral of William C. Aitken, 87, retired builder, who died Saturday at his home at 421 Penn street, will be held at 2 p.m. Wednesday. Mr. Aitken was one of the best known builders of his day. He erected more than 200 houses, principally on Cooper street, He built rows on both sides of that street from Ninth to Eleventh streets, He also constructed another, row at Seventh street and Woodland avenue.

Aitken Funeral to be on Wednesday

The funeral of William C. Aitken, 87, retired builder, who died Saturday at his home at 421 Penn street, will be held at 2 p.m. Wednesday.

The funeral of William C. Aitken, 87, retired builder, who died Saturday at his home at 421 Penn street, will be held at 2 p.m. Wednesday.

W.C. Aitken Dies at 87

The funeral of William C. Aitken, 87, retired builder, who died Saturday at his home at 421 Penn street, will be held at 2 p.m. Wednesday.

Mr. Aitken was one of the best known builders of his day. He erected more than 200 houses, principally on Cooper street, He built rows on both sides of that street from Ninth to Eleventh streets, He also constructed another, row at Seventh street and Woodland avenue.

He had been a resident of Camden for more than 50 years. He is survived by four sons and two daughters: Edward C., chief engineer for the West Jersey Title and Guaranty Company; Richard C, and Henry W., of Camden, and William J., of Chicago; Mrs, Isabelle Shedaker, of Camden, and Mrs. Lydie R. Brooks, of Contra Costa, California. He is also survived by nine grand children and-two great grandchildren.

He was the husband of the late Elizabeth C. Aitken. Mr. Aitken was a member of First Presbyterian Church. Rev. Augustus D. Whitney, Jr., pastor, will have charge of the services and burial will be in Locustwood Cemetery

OVER IN CAMDEN Articles of incorporation were filed yesterday by the American Metal Edge Box Company. The police were notified yesterday that William Ilgenfritz, 14 years old, of 1121 Mickle street, was missing. Jacob N. Wise, 63 years old, fell from a etep at Delaware and Market streets yesterday and broke his shin. He was takeo to the Cooper Hospital. A number of church people have filed a remonstrance with the excise Commission against granting a liquor license to Charles Gorden, of Ninth street amd Ferry avenue. Mrs. Victor Kline, of 526 Vine street. discovered a burglar in the house early Tuesday morning, but the thief fled at her approach, leaving a lot af clothing and silverware which he had bundled up, ready to take away Charles E. Wilson was committed by Recorder Mowrey [sic] last night, charged with stealing two overcoats trom the Camden Turning Mill, at Front and Arch streets. He was captured at the Federal Street Ferry by Policeman Hartman. Bessie Hughes was held by Justice Schmits yesterday for further bearing on a charge of stealing household goods from the boarding house of Mrs. Marshall, at 121 Market Street. Some of the missing goods were found at the defendant's home. Among the latest victims of the grip in Camden are Mayor Hatch, Chief of Police Foster, City Clerk Worry Kramer, former City Counsel J. Wiliard Morgan, Charles R. Baron, New Jersey editor of the Philadelphia Record, and Policemen George Cooper,. Harry Miller. James Ware and George Anderson.

Over in Camden

OVER IN CAMDEN

Articles of incorporation were filed yesterday by the American Metal Edge Box Company.

The police were notified yesterday that William Ilgenfritz, 14 years old, of 1121 Mickle street, was missing.

Jacob N. Wise, 63 years old, fell from a etep at Delaware and Market streets yesterday and
broke his shin. He was takeo to the Cooper Hospital.

A number of church people have filed a remonstrance with the excise Commission against granting a liquor license to Charles Gorden, of Ninth street amd Ferry avenue.

Mrs. Victor Kline, of 526 Vine street. discovered a burglar in the house early Tuesday morning, but the thief fled at her approach, leaving a lot af clothing and silverware which he had bundled up, ready to take away

Charles E. Wilson was committed by Recorder Mowrey [sic] last night, charged with stealing two overcoats trom the Camden Turning Mill, at Front and Arch streets. He was captured at the Federal Street Ferry by Policeman Hartman.

Bessie Hughes was held by Justice Schmits yesterday for further bearing on a charge of
stealing household goods from the boarding house of Mrs. Marshall, at 121 Market Street. Some of the missing goods were found at the defendant’s home.

Among the latest victims of the grip in Camden are Mayor Hatch, Chief of Police Foster, City Clerk Worry Kramer, former City Counsel J. Wiliard Morgan, Charles R. Baron, New
Jersey editor of the Philadelphia Record, and Policemen George Cooper,. Harry Miller. James
Ware and George Anderson.

Camden builders do not seem to be deterred by the fear of financial panic or an idea that the McKinley bill presages disaster in business. New operations are in progress, and several extensive ones are contemplated early in the coming year.

New Buildings Going Up

Camden builders do not seem to be deterred by the fear of financial panic or an idea that the McKinley bill presages disaster in business. New operations are in progress, and several extensive ones are contemplated early in the coming year.