Tag: Berkley Street

Berkley Hall in August of 2003

Berkley Hall

Berkley Hall was built in 1895. It stands at 601 Berkley Street, the northeast corner of 6th and Berkeley Streets.

Amanda Alloway

MRS. AMANDA ALLOWAY was born in New Jersey in November of 1843, according to the 1900 Census. By 1863 she had married Joseph Alloway. A son, Charles Alloway, was born in December of 1863. Another son, Joseph came November 22, 1865, and there was also a daughter, Ida May, was born around 1867. By the time the Census was taken in 1870 the Alloways had moved to Gloucester City, New Jersey. The 1872 City Directory shows the family at 901 North Front Street in North Camden. The 1878 City Directory shows them at 8 Pine Avenue in South Camden. The 1880 Census shows Joseph and Amanda Alloway and their three children still living on Pine Avenue, which was renamed Clare Street shortly thereafter. This street is one block long, running from Pine Street south to Division Street between South 3rd and South 4th Streets. Joseph Alloway worked as a carpenter. The 1890 and 1896 City Directories show Joseph and Amanda Alloway living at 510 Division Street. The 1898 City Directory shows that Amanda Alloway was now a widow.

Charles L. Alcott

Charles L. Alcott was the son of Logan Alcott and his wife, the former Elizabeth Ann Bodine. The Alcotts were living in Camden as early as 1854. Logan Alcott was one of the founding stewards of Broadway Methodist Episcopal Church.Logan Alcott was in the coal business. The Alcott family was living at 440 West Street in 1864. By the following year they had moved to 425 West Street. When the Census was taken in 1870, the Alcott family consisted of Logan and Elizabeth Alcott and children William, Emeline, Daniel, Mary, Nicholas, and Charles Alcott. The Alcotts lived next door to Micijah and Emeline Bates. Emeline Bates and Elizabeth Alcott were sisters. George W. Bates, the son of Micijah and Emeline, 

Berkley Street

BERKLEY STREET was originally and was for many, many years spelled Berkeley Street. The street was named for Lord Berkeley,…

This Postcard was mailed on October 5, 1910 from Camden, New Jersey to Miss Ella Kremo at the Tivoli Theater in Sydney, Australia

A POSTCARD’S STORY

The postcard above was mailed on October 5, 1910 from Camden, New Jersey to Miss Ella Kremo at the Tivoli Theater in Sydney, Australia. When the postcard arrived in Sydney, Miss Kremo and her family, a troupe of acrobats who appeared on stage around the world, had left, leaving a forwarding address of Das Programm in Berlin, Germany. Postal authorities sent the card to Germany. The address given was insufficient, the card was never delivered, and it lay, unclaimed, in the post office in Berlin Germany until the spring of 1945.

Democrats to Hold Meetings Tonight

Considerable surprise was manifested in Camden yesterday when it was announced that Anna Turner, the sixteen-year-old daughter of Frank Turner, a prominent builder and contractor, has been marred since January 21 to Louis Voegtlin, formerly of Camden, but now of Trenton. Up until the past few days Miss Turner, who lived with her parents at 707 Line street, had been attending school. It was through the mother of Voegtlin finding a letter in his pocket addressed to "My Dear Husband" that the fact the two had been married first became known to the parents of the two. Then they confessed to having gone to Moorestown on January 21, where they were married by a minister. While the parents of the bride were somewhat chagrined at the secret marriage because of teh extreme youth of their daughter, she has been forgiven and Mr. and Mrs. Voegtlin are living happily in Trenton

News of a Day in the City of Camden

Considerable surprise was manifested in Camden yesterday when it was announced that Anna Turner, the sixteen-year-old daughter of Frank Turner, a prominent builder and contractor, has been marred since January 21 to Louis Voegtlin, formerly of Camden, but now of Trenton. Up until the past few days Miss Turner, who lived with her parents at 707 Line street, had been attending school. It was through the mother of Voegtlin finding a letter in his pocket addressed to “My Dear Husband” that the fact the two had been married first became known to the parents of the two. Then they confessed to having gone to Moorestown on January 21, where they were married by a minister. While the parents of the bride were somewhat chagrined at the secret marriage because of teh extreme youth of their daughter, she has been forgiven and Mr. and Mrs. Voegtlin are living happily in Trenton