Tag: Carman Street

Broadway Trust Building 1926

Broadway Trust

The Broadway Trust Company building was built prior to World War I. The architect was Phillip Merz who was based in Rochester NY and the building was constructed by the J. Henry Miller Co. of Baltimore MD, who also built the building which would become the Bureau of Engraving and Printing’s third home in Washington DC, and the Bank of America Building in Baltimore MD.

George W. Anderson

GEORGE W. ANDERSON was born in New Jersey in May of 1862. He married around 1882, by the time the census was taken in 1900 his wife Lizzie had bore eight children, four of whom were living at the time, Harry, Nellie, Herbert, and Russell Anderson, another son, Albert, was born around 1902. George W. Anderson was already serving as a member of the Camden Police Department, having joined the force sometime after 1890. The Anderson family was then living at 711 Carman Street, in what was then Camden’s 9th Ward. The Andersons had moved to 605 Carman Street by 1906, and remained at that address through the summer of 1910.

By 1914 the Andersons had moved to 582 Clinton Street, where they would remain through 1920. This home had been the residence in the 1880s and 1890s of Camden educators Professor Horatio Draper and his daughter Agnes Draper.

George W. Anderson had been promoted to Sergeant by 1916, and was still on the Camden police force in January of 1920.

In 1921 Sergeant Anderson took ill. He was operated on in Philadelphia, surviving only due to the availability of blood donated by his brother officers. He took ill again in January of 1922. George W. Anderson and Lizzie Anderson do not appear in the 1924 City Directory or the 1930 Census. It is likely that they had passed on by then. Son Herbert Anderson joined the Camden Police Department in the early 1920s and rose to the rank of lieutenant before passing away in November of 1939. Another son, Russell J. Anderson, served with the Camden Fire Department for over 27 years, from December of 1930 until his death in June of 1958.

Three Camden policemen were injured, one of them seriously, last night, when the First district auto ambulance was struck by a trolley car while responding to a call from 2310 Carman street, where Bodine Stratton, 39 years old, had shot himself over the heart. All were taken to Cooper Hospital.

3 Policemen Hurt As Car Hits Ambulance

Three Camden policemen were injured, one of them seriously, last night, when the First district auto ambulance was struck by a trolley car while responding to a call from 2310 Carman street, where Bodine Stratton, 39 years old, had shot himself over the heart. All were taken to Cooper Hospital.