Tag: Engine Company 1

Samuel M. Subers

SAMUEL SUBERS was appointed to the Camden Fire Department at some point not long after November 12, 1874 as a replacement for Alfred S. Ivins as an extra man with Engine Company 1. He served until April of 1876, when incoming Chief of the department Claudius Bradshaw made wholesale personnel changes within the department. He was reappointed in April 8, 1878 and served until April 5, 1882, again as an extra man with Engine Company 1.

Engine Company 1 - 1949

Engine Company 1

Raymond T. Amos

Raymond T. Amos

RAYMOND T. AMOS was born in Frankford, Delaware on December 28, 1905 to Albert and Catherine Amos. His father was a minister. The family had moved to Camden by the summer of 1910 and taken up residence at 1004 Central Avenue. 

Eugene Alston

Eugene F. Alston

EUGENE F. ALSTON was born October  16, 1919 in Camden to Richard Alston and his wife, the former Dolly Robinson. His father had been born in 1891 in Henderson, North Carolina. Richard Alston was working as a laborer at the Victor Talking Machine Company in June of 1917, and had married. Mr. and Mrs. Alston then lived in Camden at 1017 Francis Street, a small street that ran south from Walnut to Chestnut Street, between Front and South 2nd Streets.  

Thomas R Allibone Civil War Pension Card

Thomas R. Allibone

THOMAS R. ALLIBONE was one of the original members of the Camden Fire Department, entering service on September 2, 1869 as an extra man with Engine Company 1. Prior to entering the fire department he had worked as a coppersmith, and had served as a volunteer fire fighter with Independence Steam Engine Fire Company. Thomas Allibone was living at 250 Pine Street when he joined the department in the fall of 1869. 

Charles L. Alcott

Charles L. Alcott was the son of Logan Alcott and his wife, the former Elizabeth Ann Bodine. The Alcotts were living in Camden as early as 1854. Logan Alcott was one of the founding stewards of Broadway Methodist Episcopal Church.Logan Alcott was in the coal business. The Alcott family was living at 440 West Street in 1864. By the following year they had moved to 425 West Street. When the Census was taken in 1870, the Alcott family consisted of Logan and Elizabeth Alcott and children William, Emeline, Daniel, Mary, Nicholas, and Charles Alcott. The Alcotts lived next door to Micijah and Emeline Bates. Emeline Bates and Elizabeth Alcott were sisters. George W. Bates, the son of Micijah and Emeline, 

Manpower of two Engine Companies get big line into service and give fire "a dash" from the street before attempting interior attack at Fourth Alarm, North 6th & Penn Streets, March 30, 1970.

The Miracle of Easter

Manpower of two Engine Companies get big line into service and give fire “a dash” from the street before attempting interior attack at Fourth Alarm, North 6th & Penn Streets, March 30, 1970.

Intersection Crash According to police, the fire apparatus, operated by James Clinton, was traveling north on 2nd st. and collided at the intersection with the tractor-trailer, driven by James FE. Tarburton Jr, 32. of St. John's dr, Wilmington, Dela. The impact of the crash tossed the firemen off the ear step of the fire truck, which was forced over a curb and along a sidewalk for about 35 feet. The vehicle sideswiped two parked ears and knocked down a parking meter. Tarburton was charged with failure to yield the right of way to a fire apparatus. The false alarm was turned in from a box at Poynt and Erie sts.

Four Firemen Suffer Hurts In Collision

Four Camden firemen were among persons injursd over the weekend in motor vehicle accidents on South Jersey roads.

The firemen were injured when their engine collided with a tractor-trailer at 2nd and Market sts. Saturday about 4.30 p.m. while they were on their way to answer an alarm which was false.

Admitted to Cooper Hospital with arm, hip and knee injuries was Orville Goldsboro, 33, of 1730 8. – Sth ee

Released after treatment were August Johnson, 39. of 91642 Chestnut st, who suffered-multi-
ple bruises; Reginald Laws, 36, of 1453 Bradley ave., chest and back injuries, and Capt. Raymond Amos, 52, of 825 Washington st., leg injuries.

A neighbor who ran several blocks Friday night when she saw smoke and flames brought firemen to rescue Samuel Liberetti, 88, of 606 Avon st., near West and Beckett sts, Liberetti was trapped in the cellar by the flames on the stairway and was found by firemen lying semi-conscious on the floor. August Johnson and Orville Goldsboro, of Engine Co. 1, donned oxygen masks and went into the home as Capt. Raymond Amos, of Engine Co. 1, wet them down and extinguished the flames on the stairs so the firemen could effect the rescue. Liberetti was treated at Cooper Hospital for smoke inhalation. District Chief Edward McDowell said the flooring of the first floor, the cellar stairway and a large pile of lumber in the cellar were burned. Mrs, Bertha Alemi, of 602 Avon, st, Was returning from shopping when she saw smoke and flames and heard shouts of help coming from the Liberetti home. She ran to the 4th and Pine sts. firehouse, to sound the alarm, Liberetti's daughter, Theresa, with whom he lives, was at work at the time of the blaze. Engine Co, 2 and Truck Co, 1 came from headquarters with McDowell.

Save Man, 88, In S. Camden Home Blaze

A neighbor who ran several blocks Friday night when she saw smoke and flames brought firemen to rescue Samuel Liberetti, 88, of 606 Avon st., near West and Beckett sts.

Photo taken 5-20-1871 in front of the Friendship Engine & Hose Company No.1 of Chambersburg, PA. The steam engine on the right has just arrived after being purchased from Millville, N.J. This apparatus was originally purchased by the Independence Fire Company No.3 of Camden in June 1864. It was a class two Amoskeag steamer bearing serial No. 92. Independence sold the apparatus to Millville in 1869.

Inception of the First Paid Fire Department in the US

On June 7, 1866 Camden’s City Council enacted an ordinance reorganizing the volunteer fire service to improve efficiency in operations. This ordinance provided for increased compensation to the fire companies (Weccacoe and Independence got $800 per annum to be paid quarterly, the Weccacoe and Shiffler Hose companies and the United States Fire Company received $200 annually). The volunteer fire companies were also directed to select a Chief Fire Marshal and three Assistant Marshals, one from each district. The selections were subject to approval by Council. The new department was called “The Fire Department of the City of Camden”. In protest of this ordinance the New Jersey Fire Company No.4 withdrew from the new, organized volunteer department.