Tag: Line Street

Zuni Athletic Association

The Zuni Athletic Association sponsored semi-pro sports teams as early as the spring of 1930 and into the early 60s. It appears to have founded in that year. Founding members included Peter Barbalace, Pasquale “Pat” Barbalace, Emil Aceto, John LaPlaca, and Jack O’Neil.

Line Street

LINE STREET was named because it followed the finally settled line of division between the Cooper and Kaighn properties. It was originally laid out as a twenty foot alley, but in 1848 was made a street fifty foot wide. In 1848, when the city charter was amended by the State legislature, Line Street became the boundary between the Middle and South wards, Arch and Federal Streets serving as the boundary between the Middle and North Wards. Line Street is not to be confused with Liney Ditch, also known as Little Newton Creek and Kaighn’s Run, which served as the southern boundary of the South Ward. In time, under the encroachments of settlers and the march of industrial progress, the stream began to fill up and became merely a ditch, to which, by common consent, the name Line Ditch was given, as it also served to divide the lands of the Kaighn and Mickle families.

The Second Convention Hall postcards from 1900s-1910s. The building was then known as the Third Regiment Armory.

Convention Hall

Camden has had two buildings known as Convention Hall, which can get a bit confusing, and the issue gets even more confusing when you add the fact that Camden had four different armories in the years between 1880 and 1960, and one of them was also called Convention Hall! It doesn’t help either that Convention Hall was also often referred to as the Civic Center during the 1920s, 1930s, 1940s, and early 1950s.

Charles A. Aceto

Charles A. Aceto

CHARLES ANGELO ACETO was born in Italy on April 16, 1891 and came to America with his father in 1900. He threw himself into his education and into becoming proficient in the English language. He went into the bus and taxi business for himself with one station wagon, and by 1924 was operating a fleet of eight buses, providing regular service between the Market Street ferry and Parkside.

Royden Street

Royden Street

Royden Street, in Camden, NJ, was named in honor of William Roydon, a grocer from London, England. When he became one of the largest landowners in West Jersey, he was selected to be a member of the first Council of Proprietors.

MAGIN PROMOTES 3, REHIRES 3, FIRES 4

Three dismissals, three promotions and four reinstatements and two new hirings were announced yesterday by City Commissioner Henry Magin, director of public works.

Vets in Colorful Memorial Crowd Convention Hall

More than 2500 persons attended a joint veterans memorial observance in Convention Hall which followed a parade of veterans and civic organizations yesterday afternoon.

Considerable surprise was manifested in Camden yesterday when it was announced that Anna Turner, the sixteen-year-old daughter of Frank Turner, a prominent builder and contractor, has been marred since January 21 to Louis Voegtlin, formerly of Camden, but now of Trenton. Up until the past few days Miss Turner, who lived with her parents at 707 Line street, had been attending school. It was through the mother of Voegtlin finding a letter in his pocket addressed to "My Dear Husband" that the fact the two had been married first became known to the parents of the two. Then they confessed to having gone to Moorestown on January 21, where they were married by a minister. While the parents of the bride were somewhat chagrined at the secret marriage because of teh extreme youth of their daughter, she has been forgiven and Mr. and Mrs. Voegtlin are living happily in Trenton

News of a Day in the City of Camden

Considerable surprise was manifested in Camden yesterday when it was announced that Anna Turner, the sixteen-year-old daughter of Frank Turner, a prominent builder and contractor, has been marred since January 21 to Louis Voegtlin, formerly of Camden, but now of Trenton. Up until the past few days Miss Turner, who lived with her parents at 707 Line street, had been attending school. It was through the mother of Voegtlin finding a letter in his pocket addressed to “My Dear Husband” that the fact the two had been married first became known to the parents of the two. Then they confessed to having gone to Moorestown on January 21, where they were married by a minister. While the parents of the bride were somewhat chagrined at the secret marriage because of teh extreme youth of their daughter, she has been forgiven and Mr. and Mrs. Voegtlin are living happily in Trenton

The Year 1833 – Camden, NJ

That section of the city commonly known as Fettersville was purchased by Richard Fetters in 1833 from Charity and Grace Kaighn and embraced the land lying between Line and Cherry Streets, extending from Third Street to the Delaware River. Fetters, a Quaker, was a political and civic leader light years ahead of his time in his commitment to address the needs of his fellow citizens, and was involved the 1828 incorporation of Camden. The town of Fettersville grew rapidly, and in 1835 an additional tract was purchased from the Kaighn family extending south to Mount Vernon Street.