Tag: Pearl Street

Posted in People

William C. Aitken

WILLIAM C. AITKEN was born around 1846. He first came to America in 1869. He moved to Camden in the early 1880s. He was active as a builder in the latter part of the 19th and early 20th centuries. He built rows of homes on Cooper Street between 9th and 11th Streets. Many of these homes were destroyed in the 1940 Hollingshead fire. He also built a row of homes on Seventh street at Woodland Avenue. At the time of the 1920 Census he made his home with wife Elizabeth at 205 Pearl Street. This home was taken in late 1923 or early 1924 to make way for the Delaware River (Ben Franklin) Bridge.

William C. Aitken later made his home at 421 Penn Street in Camden, which is now part of the Rutgers University campus. He lived very near to advertising magnate F. Wayland Ayer.

William C. Aitken died on February 14, 1933. He was survived by four sons and two daughters, nine children, and two great grandchildren. His grandson, Richard Knight Aitken, died while serving with the United States Army in Louisiana on February 17, 1943.

Vincent Tydeman Profile Photo
Posted in People

Vincent Ariel Tydeman

VINCENT ARIEL TYDEMAN was born in New Jersey on August 24, 1883 to Edmund and Sarah Tydeman, who had come to America from England in 1878 with their nine children.

Dwellings, N.W. Cor. 4th and Cedar Streets, Camden, NJ. Damaged by Wind Storm, April 2nd, 1912
Posted in News Articles

Camden Cyclone of April 2, 1912

The city of Camden was hit by tornadoes, or as they were then called, cyclones, on two occasions, August 3, 1885 and April 2, 1912. The first storm destroyed the Tabernacle Baptist Church at North 3rd and Pearl Street, and caused damage to buildings at North 3rd and Main Streets and elsewhere.

Post Office Agent Barrett was alarmed on Saturday by receiving a telegram requesting him to meet at the depot Postal Inspector. William Abels, then on his way from Reading, and believed to have been attacked and badly hurt. Mr. Barrett accordingly met Mr. Abels at the 5.30 train, and asked him if he had been hurt, when the latter displayed his hand, which was cut and bloody, and bore the appearance of having had some rough instrument drawn forcibly through it. Afterward he put his hand to tho back of his head, where examination showed that he had been dealt a heavy blow, which had cut through his stiff felt hat.
Posted in News Articles

Postal Inspector Hurt

Philadelphia Inquirer – January 14, 1885
Post Office Agent Barrett was alarmed on Saturday by receiving a telegram requesting him to meet at the depot Postal Inspector William Abels, then on his way from Reading, and believed to have been attacked and badly hurt. Mr. Barrett accordingly met Mr, Abels at the 5.30 train, and asked him if he had been hurt, when the latter displayed his hand, which was cut and bloody, and bore the appearance of having had some rough instrument drawn forcibly through it. Afterward he put his hand to tho back of his head, where examination showed that he had been dealt a heavy blow, which had cut through his stiff felt hat.