Tag: R.M. Hollingshed Company

Memory Stock Photo
Posted in Historical Accounts

Centennial Mirror 1828-1928

A centennial review: the year was 1927 and the future had hardly ever looked brighter for the City of Camden. Times were prosperous, business and industry were booming, and the city was full of recently constructed public buildings, civic improvements, schools, the new Delaware River bridge and its new highway to the suburbs. The stock market crash of 1929 and the Depression that followed were in the unimagined future.

The Hurley Store on Broadway, a great big structure conducted on progressive lines as is proven by the manner in which the buying public bestows its patronage. The Hurley service has become a byword with thousands of South Jersey families. its occupants.
Posted in Businesses

CAMDEN INDUSTRIES

Various industries in Camden, circa 1929

Posted in News Articles

WEARSHING READY FOR OPENING NIGHT

Grover Wearshing, whose football feats and dazzling play on the basketball boards, form a glowing part of the athletic history of Camden High School and Temple University, has enlisted with the Camden Club in the Eastern League and will join the team when the inaugural skirmish with the Kennett Square (Pa.) quintet is staged at the Convention Hall annex tonight.

Posted in News Articles

Whiz Five to Clash with Peerless Foe

All the tension connected with advance preparations will subside at 8 o’clock tonight when two of the eight teams in the Camden County Industrial League start the race for the 1930 championship. The opening event will be a clash between R.M. Hollingshead and the Peerless Kid Quintets and the action will be served as a preliminary feature to the Eastern League contest at the Convention Hall annex.

Just one hundred years ago today, a little group of men went before the Legislature and asked that body to incorporate as a city the straggling and struggling village of Camden. If these men could now visit the city born that day through their efforts, they might well feel that their labor of love was not in vain. For the village of 1,143 people in 1828 has become a great city of close to 200,000 today. By estimate of the United States Census Department, the population on July 1, 1927, was 133,100. This does not include the thickly populated interlocking suburbs, neither does it make allowance for the enormous influx of home-seekers who have followed Camden Bridge to the Jersey side of the Delaware since 1926.
Posted in News Articles

CAMDEN – A Great City Growing Greater

Just one hundred years ago today, a little group of men went before the Legislature and asked that body to incorporate as a city the straggling and struggling village of Camden. If these men could now visit the city born that day through their efforts, they might well feel that their labor of love was not in vain. For the village of 1,143 people in 1828 has become a great city of close to 200,000 today. By estimate of the United States Census Department, the population on July 1, 1927, was 133,100. This does not include the thickly populated interlocking suburbs, neither does it make allowance for the enormous influx of home-seekers who have followed Camden Bridge to the Jersey side of the Delaware since 1926.

Circuit Court Judge Frank T. Lloyd yesterday accepted chairmanship of the Camden Chamber of Commerce Committee which is to study the unemployment question and make suggestions for remedial measures. With Judge Lloyd on the committee are: Alban Eavenson, of Eavenson & Levering; Belford G. Royal, of the Victor Talking Machine Company; Congressman Francis F. Patterson. Mayor Charles H. Ellis, former United States Senator David Baird, I. A Hawkes, of the Hunt Pen Company; Frank Vanhart, president of City Council, and an official of the Esterbrook Pen Company; John Prentice, director of the Board of Freeholders; Burleigh B. Draper, of the Broadway Trust Company. A. C Dorrance, of the Campbell Soup Company; Lawyer William S. Darnell, CW, Tomlinson, of the R. M. Hollinshed Company; James V. Moran, of the Hurley Company; Rev. Thomas J. Whelen pastor of the Church of the Holy Name; J. D. Johnson. of the State Employment Bureau: Rev Charles B. Dubell, director of St. John's P. E. Church; Elmer E. Long, of Munger & Long: Mrs. Dr. A. H. Lippincott, Mrs. W. Penn Corson and Mrs. Harry Pelouze.
Posted in News Articles

New Chairmanship of the Camden Chamber of Commerce Committee

Circuit Court Judge Frank T. Lloyd yesterday accepted chairmanship of the Camden Chamber of Commerce Committee which is to study the unemployment question and make suggestions for remedial measures. With Judge Lloyd on the committee are: Alban Eavenson, of Eavenson & Levering; Belford G. Royal, of the Victor Talking Machine Company; Corgressman Francis F. Patterson. Mayor Charles H. Ellis, former United States Senator David Baird, I. A Hawkes, of the Hunt Pen Company; Frank Vanhart, president of City Council, and an official of the Esterbrook Pen Company; John Prentice, director of the Board of Freeholders; Burleigh B. Draper, of the Broadway Trust Company. A. C Dorrance, of the Campbell Soup Company; Lawyer William S. Darnell, CW, Tomlinson, of the R. M. Hollingshed Company; James V. Moran, of the Hurley Company; Rev. Thomas J. Whelen pastor of the Church of the Holy Name; J. D. Johnson. of the State Employment Bureau: Rev Charles B. Dubell, director of St. John’s P. BE. Church; Eimer E. Long, of Munger & Long: Mrs. Dr. A. H. Lippincott, Mrs. W. Penn Carson and Mrs. Harry Pelouze.