Tag: Samuel B. F. Alcott

Samuel B.F. Alcott Gravestone
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Samuel B. F. Alcott

SAMUEL B.F. ALCOTT was born in New Jersey in February, 1855 to John Alcott and his wife, the former Elizabeth Fox, most likely in Burlington County, New Jersey, where he resided though at least 1870. By 1880 Samuel Alcott had moved to Camden, New Jersey.

Samuel Alcott served with the Camden Fire Department in 1882 and 1883, as a turnkey at the County Jail in the late 1880s, and also was a member of the Camden Police Department as late as 1905. Late in life he worked as a watchman at the Camden Post Office. Politically aligned with the Democrats, in the full-contact sport that was Camden politics in the years between the Civil War and World War I, Samuel Alcott was a frequent participant.

Samuel Alcott married Rhoda Conn in 1887. Two sons, Richard Smith Alcott and William J. Alcott were born of this marriage.

Samuel B.F. Alcott passed in 1921 and was buried at Pemberton Baptist Church in Pemberton, New Jersey.

As predicted in yesterday's Inquirer a fusion ticket is to be supported by the Democrat machine at the coming primaries in Camden. Yesterday was the last day for filing nominating petitions and a mixed ticket is shown by the Democrats. Dr. Duncan W. Blake. the candidate for Sheriff is a former Progressive, and Louis Le Duc, one of the assistants for Assembly, is a Republican. The rest of the ticket is made up of Democrats and shows no change from that published yesterday. No nomination is made for the office of Coroner. For membership-at-large on the county ticket the nominations are Walter Farrell, John Cleary, Russell Carrow and Samuel B. F. Alcott
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Camden Democrats File Fusion Ticket

As predicted in yesterday’s Inquirer a fusion ticket is to be supported by the Democrat machine at the coming primaries in Camden. Yesterday was the last day for filing nominating petitions and a mixed ticket is shown by the Democrats.

Dr. Duncan W. Blake. the candidate for Sheriff is a former Progressive, and Louis Le Duc, one of the assistants for Assembly, is a Republican. The rest of the ticket is made up of Democrats and shows no change from that published yesterday.

No nomination is made for the office of Coroner. For membership-at-large on the county ticket the nominations are Walter Farrell, John Cleary, Russell Carrow and Samuel B. F. Alcott

Considerable surprise was manifested in Camden yesterday when it was announced that Anna Turner, the sixteen-year-old daughter of Frank Turner, a prominent builder and contractor, has been marred since January 21 to Louis Voegtlin, formerly of Camden, but now of Trenton. Up until the past few days Miss Turner, who lived with her parents at 707 Line street, had been attending school. It was through the mother of Voegtlin finding a letter in his pocket addressed to "My Dear Husband" that the fact the two had been married first became known to the parents of the two. Then they confessed to having gone to Moorestown on January 21, where they were married by a minister. While the parents of the bride were somewhat chagrined at the secret marriage because of teh extreme youth of their daughter, she has been forgiven and Mr. and Mrs. Voegtlin are living happily in Trenton
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News of a Day in the City of Camden

Considerable surprise was manifested in Camden yesterday when it was announced that Anna Turner, the sixteen-year-old daughter of Frank Turner, a prominent builder and contractor, has been marred since January 21 to Louis Voegtlin, formerly of Camden, but now of Trenton. Up until the past few days Miss Turner, who lived with her parents at 707 Line street, had been attending school. It was through the mother of Voegtlin finding a letter in his pocket addressed to “My Dear Husband” that the fact the two had been married first became known to the parents of the two. Then they confessed to having gone to Moorestown on January 21, where they were married by a minister. While the parents of the bride were somewhat chagrined at the secret marriage because of teh extreme youth of their daughter, she has been forgiven and Mr. and Mrs. Voegtlin are living happily in Trenton

Former Policeman Samuel B. F. Alcott fell at the Taylor grain elevator yesterday, tearing his left leg. He was treated at the Cooper Hospital.
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Samuel B. F. Alcott Injured

Former Policeman Samuel B. F. Alcott fell at the Taylor grain elevator yesterday, tearing his left leg. He was treated at the Cooper Hospital.

Attacked at Third and Mickle streets, Camden, late Monday night by a man, Mrs. Bessie O. Day, of Seventh and Clinton streets, had her clothing cutt in strips. The man, said to be a male acquaintance, followed Mrs. Day off a ferryboat and attacked her near the P. R. R. Y. M. C. A. A. Building into which the frightened woman ran for protection. He wielded a razor and came within an inch of slashing the woman's throat. The police were notified and are looking for the man, whose name is known.
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News and Incidents of a Day in Camden

Attacked at Third and Mickle streets, Camden, late Monday night by a man, Mrs. Bessie O. Day, of Seventh and Clinton streets, had her clothing cutt in strips. The man, said to be a male acquaintance, followed Mrs. Day off a ferryboat and attacked her near the P. R. R. Y. M. C. A. A. Building into which the frightened woman ran for protection. He wielded a razor and came within an inch of slashing the woman’s throat. The police were notified and are looking for the man, whose name is known.

Policeman Samuel B. F. Alcott was tried last night by the Police Committee of the Camden City Council and dismissed from the service of the city, having been charged with assault and battery upon William Morris, a fireman. .
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Policeman Will Contest Dismissal

Policeman Samuel B. F. Alcott was tried last night by the Police Committee of the Camden City Council and dismissed from the service of the city, having been charged with assault and battery upon William Morris, a fireman. .

According to a statement made by a member of the Police Committee of Camden City Council to an Inquirer reporter yesterday, charges will be preferred against a number of Democratic policemen during the week and the resignations of the officers are likely to follow.
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More Policemen to go In Camden

According to a statement made by a member of the Police Committee of Camden City Council to an Inquirer reporter yesterday, charges will be preferred against a number of Democratic policemen during the week and the resignations of the officers are likely to follow.

The new Board of Freeholders of Camden county had a lively meeting yesterday. The appointment of jailers for the county prison was the bone of contention. A minority of the Court House Committee recommended the appointment of John Lee, in place of Abel Miller; Frank B. Vache, in place of D. M. Spence: George Lawson, in place of Jailer Johnson, and W. K. Price as as assistant janitor, in palace of James Mortimer.
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Had a Lively Session

The new Board of Freeholders of Camden county had a lively meeting yesterday. The appointment of jailers for the county prison was the bone of contention. A minority of the Court House Committee recommended the appointment of John Lee, in place of Abel Miller; Frank B. Vache, in place of D. M. Spence: George Lawson, in place of Jailer Johnson, and W. K. Price as as assistant janitor, in palace of James Mortimer.

There will probably be a lively meeting of the Americus Club, of Camden, tomorrow evening. The club is an organization of stalwart Democrats. Ex-Assemblyman William J. Thompson, owner of the Gloucester race-track, and Samuel B. F. Alcott, are members.
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Alcott Retaliates

There will probably be a lively meeting of the Americus Club, of Camden, tomorrow evening. The club is an organization of stalwart Democrats. Ex-Assemblyman William J. Thompson, owner of the Gloucester race-track, and Samuel B. F. Alcott, are members.

A 12-year-old son of Policeman Ripley was badly bitten by dogs. On complaint of his wife that he had removed shells from their child’s grave, Samuel B. F. Alcott was held under bail yesterday by Justice Quinn. Jaines Cullen, at one time a popular comedian on the boards of Fox's Variety Theatre, Philadelphia, was before Justice Paul as a "drunk" yesterday. Hotelkeeper Charles Ricker, of Tenth and Federal streets, discovered that his bartender, who was about to sail for Australia, had "knocked down" $170 from the bar receipts. The money was recovered.
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Over In Camden

A 12-year-old son of Policeman Ripley was badly bitten by dogs.

On complaint of his wife that he had removed shells from their child’s grave, Samuel B. F. Alcott was held under bail yesterday by Justice Quinn.

Jaines Cullen, at one time a popular comedian on the boards of Fox’s Variety Theatre, Philadelphia, was before Justice Paul as a “drunk” yesterday.

Hotelkeeper Charles Ricker, of Tenth and Federal streets, discovered that his bartender, who was about to sail for Australia, had “knocked down” $170 from the bar receipts. The money was recovered.

Jail Warden Samuel Alcott, of Camden, yesterday took Daniel Quinn, a 10 year-old into the Reform school. He was sentenced to that institution last week by Judge Hugg for larceny.
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Camden News

Jail Warden Samuel Alcott, of Camden, yesterday took Daniel Quinn, a 10 year-old into the Reform school. He was sentenced to that institution last week by Judge Hugg for larceny.

Philadelphia, Pa., Nov. 7, 1885.—At a quarter after twelve o’clock today a warrant was sworn out before Magistrate Cassady, of Camden, for the arrest of Harry Gallagher, the democratic judge of the First precinct of the Seventh ward, on the charge of altering and falsifying the returns of his precinct in the interest of Branning. Officers are now scouring this city and Camden for him, but it is alleged that he has fled. Mr. Burrough, the republican candidate for County Clerk, claims a clear majority of 120 over Mr. Branning, and his friends propose to stand up for his and their rights and to secure them. The Seventh ward and Gloucester city precinct returns bear every evidence of having been altered. City Solicitor Morgan, while Harry Gallagher, the Judge of the First precinct of the seventh ward, was reading off his returns, looked over his shoulder and states that he saw where the words "eighty-three votes for Burrough" had been crossed out and the words "forty-three votes for Burrough" written over it, and the words "one hundred and sixty-three votes for Branning" changed to "two hundred and three votes for Branning." The ink was not dry on the paper, and it had evidently just been done.
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Election Frauds in Camden

Philadelphia, Pa., Nov. 7, 1885.—At a quarter after twelve o’clock today a warrant was sworn out before Magistrate Cassady, of Camden, for the arrest of Harry Gallagher, the democratic judge of the First precinct of the Seventh ward, on the charge of altering and falsifying the returns of his precinct in the interest of Branning. Officers are now scouring this city and Camden for him, but it is alleged that he has fled. Mr. Burrough, the republican candidate for County Clerk, claims a clear majority of 120 over Mr. Branning, and his friends propose to stand up for his and their rights and to secure them. The Seventh ward and Gloucester city precinct returns bear every evidence of having been altered. City Solicitor Morgan, while Harry Gallagher, the Judge of the First precinct of the seventh ward, was reading off his returns, looked over his shoulder and states that he saw where the words “eighty-three votes for Burrough” had been crossed out and the words “forty-three votes for Burrough” written over it, and the words “one hundred and sixty-three votes for Branning” changed to “two hundred and three votes for Branning.” The ink was not dry on the paper, and it had evidently just been done.