Tag: Walt Whitman

Alley Street Stock Photo
Posted in Streets

Mickle Street

MICKLE STREET was named after John W. Mickle, a prominent figure in both local and State affairs in the 1840’s and 1850’s.

Memory Stock Photo
Posted in Historical Accounts

Centennial Mirror 1828-1928

A centennial review: the year was 1927 and the future had hardly ever looked brighter for the City of Camden. Times were prosperous, business and industry were booming, and the city was full of recently constructed public buildings, civic improvements, schools, the new Delaware River bridge and its new highway to the suburbs. The stock market crash of 1929 and the Depression that followed were in the unimagined future.

Walt Whitman; Center: The Whitman home at 330 Mickle Street, owned and maintained by the City of Camden as a literary shrine. The poet's last resting place in Camden's beautiful Harleigh Cemetery where he lies beside his beloved mother. The burial lot was given to him as a Christmas present in 1890 by a group of friends.
Posted in Historical Accounts

A Stranger Arrives

Along in the springtime of 1873 there appeared in the streets of Camden a strange, tall, limping man, clad in a somber grey. His general appearance was enhanced by the picturesqueness of his flawing white beard­ his large white collar loosened at the throat ­and the manner in which he carried his head ­proudly, but without disdain.

Postcard was published within 15 years of Walt Whitman's passing, and is most contemporary picture I've seen to date of the house as it would have looked during the poet's lifetime
Posted in Historic Homes

The Walt Whitman House

The Walt Whitman House is a historic building in Camden, New Jersey, United States, and is on the National Register of Historic Places which was the last residence of American poet Walt Whitman, in his declining years before his death. It is located at 328 Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. Boulevard, known as Mickle St. during Whitman’s time there.

Walt Whitman Portrait, courtesy The Courier-Post.
Posted in People

Walt Whitman

WALT WHITMAN, Camden’s “Good Grey Poet’, the life of whom a subject that has been written on at length by many people far wiser than I. Rather than rehash much that is to be read elsewhere, I will present things of interest concerning Whitman, his life and times in and around Camden, and comments by those who knew him and other contemporaries.

A Whitman year in America found new honors and oratorical glory for Camden's Good Gray Poet, whose 130th birthday anniversary was celebrated here yesterday under auspices of the Walt Whitman Foundation. Left are seen Thomas B. Donaldson, who knew Whitman; Mrs. Elizabeth Cady Conover, and Ralph W. Wescott, member of the foundation. All three were speakers at the exercises held at headquarters of the Camden County Historical Society.
Posted in News Articles

Walt Whitman Acclaimed as ‘International Prophet’

Acknowledged by the world as the poet of democracy, Camden’s own Walt Whitman was acclaimed here yesterday on the 120th anniversary of his birth as the “prophet of a new internationalism.”

Mrs. Augusta K. Dole, New York woman, posed with etching on "The Song of the Open Road," as she sat in last chair Walt Whitman occupied at Mickle Street Home.
Posted in News Articles

400 Friends Pay Homage to ‘Good Gray Poet’

That’s Mickle Street where Walt Whitman, the “Good Gray Poet,” once lived, and old friends came back here from near and far yesterday to mingle under the portals of the house in which he wrote his famous works, on the 114th anniversary of his birth.

The City Council of Camden, New Jersey, has voted that the home in which Walt Whitman passed the later years of his life and in which on March 26, 1892, he died shall not be destroyed but shall be preserved intact on the site where it stands. There had been a suggestion that it be removed to one of the city's parks. This did not meet the Council's approval. The house will stand where it is and where it stood when Walt Whitman lived and died in it.
Posted in News Articles

Walt Whitman’s Home in Camden

The City Council of Camden, New Jersey, has voted that the home in which Walt Whitman passed the later years of his life and in which on March 26, 1892, he died shall not be destroyed but shall be preserved intact on the site where it stands. There had been a suggestion that it be removed to one of the city’s parks. This did not meet the Council’s approval. The house will stand where it is and where it stood when Walt Whitman lived and died in it.

Philadelphia, Sept. 15. - Toward sundown this evening, as Walt Whitman was half dozing over a pile of manuscript near a window in his little frame house in Camden, the jarring rattle of wheels startled the old man, and a smart chestnut horse drew a natty phaeton up to the door. The poet glanced over his flowers at the turnout and nodded kindly to the little chap who held the reins, for he was a favorite, the son of his old friend Tom Donaldson. The boy carefully tied the animal and handed up with a mysterious air a portentious [sic] envelope, big and fat, and started to walk away, but was called back and induced to enter the cozy workshop.
Posted in News Articles

Walt Whitman Surprised

oward sundown this evening, as Walt Whitman was half dozing over a pile of manuscript near a window in his little frame house in Camden, the jarring rattle of wheels startled the old man, and a smart chestnut horse drew a natty phaeton up to the door.

Walt Whitman's will, the substance of which was published two weeks ago, was filed yesterday in the Camden County Surrogate's office. The entire estate is valued at about $3500.
Posted in News Articles

Walt Whitman’s Will

Walt Whitman’s will, the substance of which was published two weeks ago, was filed yesterday in the Camden County Surrogate’s office

Posted in Buildings

Morgan Hall

Morgan’s Hall, also known as Morgan Hall, was built by the Independent Order of Odd Fellows. The cornerstone of Morgan’s Hall, or as it was originally called, Odd Fellows Hall, at the southeast corner of Fourth and Market Streets, was laid on October 5, 1848.