Tag: Washington Street

Edward J Borden, Sr, 1933-06-09. Edward J. Borden who was the guest of honor at a testimonial dinner in the Camden Club last night on the occasion of his election as president of the New Jersey Real Estate Commission. The dinner also marked his twentieth wedding anniversary, and Mrs. Borden was similarly feted at another dinner.
Posted in People

Edward J. Borden

EDWARD J. BORDEN SR. was born in Boston, Massachusetts on January 12, 1888 to John and Beatrice Borden, both of whom were born in Canada. The elder Borden was a boilermaker by trade. The family moved to Illinois shortly after Edward Borden’s birth, residing there as early as 1890 and as late as July of 1899, when his sister Beatrice was born. The family soon relocated again, this time to Wilmington DE, where they resided at 1205 Elm Street.

Bernard A. Ahlberg's signature
Posted in People

Bernard A. Ahlberg Biography

BERNARD ABRAHAM AHLBERG, former captain of industry, of Camden, New Jersey, and leader in all its departments of life, was born September 18, 1858, in Sweden, and died May 24, 1925. His parents were Abraham and Inga (Friedberg) Ahlberg. His father was of Scotch and his mother, of German descent. His father, who was a ship-builder, served in the Swedish Navy in his youth. Both parents are now dead.
Bernard Abraham Ahlberg got little schooling in his boyhood. At the age of fourteen he was bound apprentice to a coppersmith, for whom he worked for three years for a total remuneration of $2.99 per annum and his board. Somehow, he had to clothe himself and pay for his washing during that period and somehow he did it. He also studied. When eighteen years of age he came to the United States, and after spending six months in Brooklyn, New York, went on to Philadelphia, where he obtained employment and remained with the same concern for nineteen years, rising to the position of superintendent and saving his money to such good purpose that in 1902 he was able to go into business with two others in Philadelphia. He dissolved this partnership in 1907, and going to Camden, founded the Camden Copper Works on Fifth Street, at Washington, whence he moved to the present site at Nos. 559-609 South Second Street, in December of 1911. The business was incorporated under the laws of New Jersey in 1912 for $50,000 fully paid, with Mr. Ahlberg as president and manager; Dr. Wesley J. Barrett, secretary, and Walter E. Ahlberg, the founder’s son, as treasurer. These also constituted the board of directors.

Bernard Abraham Ahlberg, 1924
Posted in People

Bernard A. Ahlberg

BERNARD ABRAHAM AHLBERG was born September 18, 1858, in Sweden. He came to America at the age of 18, and moved to Philadelphia shortly afterwards, where he remained until 1907, when he came to Camden. When the census was taken in 1910 the Ahlberg family owned a home at 569 Royden Street in South Camden. While in Philadelphia he worked and attended Drexel Institute (present-day Drexel University) where he remained a student until he was 44. he came to Camden in 1907, and founded the Camden Copper Works on Fifth Street, at Washington Street. The business moved to 559-609 South 2nd Street, in December of 1911. During his lifetime his business was one of the most successful of its type in America. When the census was taken in 1920 Bernard Ahlberg and family had moved to Collingswood NJ, where they owned a home at 701 Linwood Avenue.

Besides Camden Copper Works, Bernard Ahlberg was active in many, many other business ventures, civic organizations, and fraternal groups, which are detailed in the biography below, published shortly after his death. He passed away on May 24, 1925.

Intersection Crash According to police, the fire apparatus, operated by James Clinton, was traveling north on 2nd st. and collided at the intersection with the tractor-trailer, driven by James FE. Tarburton Jr, 32. of St. John's dr, Wilmington, Dela. The impact of the crash tossed the firemen off the ear step of the fire truck, which was forced over a curb and along a sidewalk for about 35 feet. The vehicle sideswiped two parked ears and knocked down a parking meter. Tarburton was charged with failure to yield the right of way to a fire apparatus. The false alarm was turned in from a box at Poynt and Erie sts.
Posted in News Articles

Four Firemen Suffer Hurts In Collision

Four Camden firemen were among persons injursd over the weekend in motor vehicle accidents on South Jersey roads.

The firemen were injured when their engine collided with a tractor-trailer at 2nd and Market sts. Saturday about 4.30 p.m. while they were on their way to answer an alarm which was false.

Admitted to Cooper Hospital with arm, hip and knee injuries was Orville Goldsboro, 33, of 1730 8. – Sth ee

Released after treatment were August Johnson, 39. of 91642 Chestnut st, who suffered-multi-
ple bruises; Reginald Laws, 36, of 1453 Bradley ave., chest and back injuries, and Capt. Raymond Amos, 52, of 825 Washington st., leg injuries.

Gustav A Koerner being inducted as the chief of the Camden police department
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Koerner Made Police Chief; Carroll, Mattison Promoted

Camden Courier-Post – November 29, 1949
Capt. Gustav Koerner, youngest of six men holding that rank in the department, today was named Camden police chief.

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MAGIN PROMOTES 3, REHIRES 3, FIRES 4

Camden Courier-Post – June 1, 1939
Three dismissals, three promotions and four reinstatements and two new hirings were announced yesterday by City Commissioner Henry Magin, director of public works.

Bail is Denied Roxie Allen - Camden NJ History
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Bail Is Denied Roxie Allen in Robbery of 15 in Craps Game

Identified as four of the five bandits who held up and robbed 15 men at a craps game in a Landisville poolroom yesterday, Roxie Allen, well-known South Jersey boxer, and three other South Camden youths are under arrest today.

Considerable surprise was manifested in Camden yesterday when it was announced that Anna Turner, the sixteen-year-old daughter of Frank Turner, a prominent builder and contractor, has been marred since January 21 to Louis Voegtlin, formerly of Camden, but now of Trenton. Up until the past few days Miss Turner, who lived with her parents at 707 Line street, had been attending school. It was through the mother of Voegtlin finding a letter in his pocket addressed to "My Dear Husband" that the fact the two had been married first became known to the parents of the two. Then they confessed to having gone to Moorestown on January 21, where they were married by a minister. While the parents of the bride were somewhat chagrined at the secret marriage because of teh extreme youth of their daughter, she has been forgiven and Mr. and Mrs. Voegtlin are living happily in Trenton
Posted in News Articles

News of a Day in the City of Camden

Considerable surprise was manifested in Camden yesterday when it was announced that Anna Turner, the sixteen-year-old daughter of Frank Turner, a prominent builder and contractor, has been marred since January 21 to Louis Voegtlin, formerly of Camden, but now of Trenton. Up until the past few days Miss Turner, who lived with her parents at 707 Line street, had been attending school. It was through the mother of Voegtlin finding a letter in his pocket addressed to “My Dear Husband” that the fact the two had been married first became known to the parents of the two. Then they confessed to having gone to Moorestown on January 21, where they were married by a minister. While the parents of the bride were somewhat chagrined at the secret marriage because of the extreme youth of their daughter, she has been forgiven and Mr. and Mrs. Voegtlin are living happily in Trenton

Camden builders do not seem to be deterred by the fear of financial panic or an idea that the McKinley bill presages disaster in business. New operations are in progress, and several extensive ones are contemplated early in the coming year.
Posted in News Articles

New Buildings Going Up

Camden Daily Courier – November 15, 1890
Camden builders do not seem to be deterred by the fear of financial panic or an idea that the McKinley bill presages disaster in business. New operations are in progress, and several extensive ones are contemplated early in the coming year.